See our impact around Emory's campuses

Explore our impact across our campuses by initiative:

  • Biodiversity & Landscape
  • Buildings
  • Energy
  • Food & Dining
  • Social Justice
  • Transportation
  • Waste
  • Water
  • Wellbeing
Druid Hills CampusOxford CampusBriarcliff CampusClairmont Campus

Lullwater Preserve

Lullwater Preserve is Emory’s largest and most pristine greenspace, serving as a natural recreational space for students, faculty, and other Emory community members to play, exercise, or spend time with friends and family. Purchased from the Candler family in 1962, Lullwater Preserve serves as a testament to Emory’s commitment to environment preservation–throughout the past half century Emory has intervened on multiple occasions when other parties pushed for development of Lullwater. Lullwater boasts environmental diversity, with an impressive spread of native white oaks, poplars, pines, sweet gums, hickories, and beeches. The preservation of this forest has allowed for the re-establishment of large mammals such as the white-tailed deer in the Decatur/Atlanta area, and also serves as an experiment grounds for Emory’s biology and environmental science classes.

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Hahn Woods

Hahn Woods was named in 1993 for T. Marshall Hahn Jr., an Emory trustee and then-CEO of Georgia-Pacific. With the help of Georgia-Pacific, Emory reclaimed these 4.7-acres from a landfill. The woods are part of a 60 acre parcel Emory acquired in 1960, which included the Houson Mill House. In 2015 Trees Atlanta instigated a project that focused on restoring the health of Hahn Woods by removing invasive species and replanting native vegetation, particularly in two acres of the woods which serve as a key connection point of the area watershed.

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Hearn Woods Nature Trail/Outdoor Classroom

On the Oxford campus, in 1978, biology professor Curry T. Haynes Sr. carved out a nature trail on the west side of the campus, winding from Williams Gym past the soldiers’ cemetery and into the woods between the cemetery and the dining hall.

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Oxford Historic District

Confederate Cemetery

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Oxhouse Pond & ENVS Center

Protecting all forms of life on campus and implementing programs to actively preserve local ecosystems are cornerstones of Emory’s environmental stewardship.

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Department of Environmental Studies

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Oxford Bamboo Forest

Protecting all forms of life on campus and implementing programs to actively preserve local ecosystems are cornerstones of Emory’s environmental stewardship

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Oxford Road Building & Parking Deck

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Mathematics and Science Center

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Samford S. Atwood Chemistry Center Addition

The Sanford S. Atwood Chemistry Addition was completed in 2015 after nearly 2 years of construction. It received LEED Gold Certification due to its many sustainability features and green building practices.

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Psychology and Interdisciplinary Sciences Building

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Rita Anne Rollins Building, Candler School of Theology

Phase I of the Candler School of Theology was completed in 2008 and received LEED silver certification in 2010. This project is unique in that the pavers used in the hardscape surrounding the building are made of a high-emittance material that lowers the site’s overall heat-island effect. The site was also the former location of buried steam pipes that were insulated with asbestos, and their remediation before the building was constructed allowed the project to earn the ‘brownfield redevelopment’ credit. Phase II was completed in August 2014. This addition to the Candler School of Theology was built with the intention of receiving LEED Silver Certification and received this certification shortly after its completion

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Candler Library

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Goizueta Business School

When you change your perspective, you can change business for good. At Goizueta, we believe in sparking passion that ignites meaningful change, debate, and insight. Here, you will go beyond for the better. Discover the principles and the people who drive Goizueta ­— and business — forward.

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Goizueta Foundation Center

The Goizueta Foundation is a private, general-purpose, grantmaking philanthropy. Since its inception, the Foundation has partnered with more than 85 organizations through 555 grants, totaling more than $386 million.

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Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Emory Children's Center

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Health Sciences Research Building

The new Health Sciences Research Building was completed in 2013 following the demolition of the Turman West Residence Hall, and was designed to achieve LEED Silver Certification. Among its unique green features include sensors which control the heating system based on number of persons in the building. Furthermore, Emory utilized many green practices in the construction of this building, as 18,548 tons of waste were recycled during construction, or 98% of all construction waste.

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James B Williams School of Medicine Building

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Alabama Hall

Renovated in the summers of 2013 and 2014, the Alabama Hall Renovation kept with Emory’s Sustainability Goals and achieved LEED Gold Certification for the many green processes incorporated into its construction, as well as the green design of the building.

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Turman Hall

At Emory, our LEED certified buildings with optimized insulation, lighting, and climate control technology reduce building energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions from building operations, as outlined in Project Drawdown as a critical climate solution.

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Hamilton Holmes Residence Hall

This fourth phase of Emory’s freshman housing was completed in the summer of 2012 and received LEED Gold Certification. The five-story residence hall features many green aspects in its design and infrastructure, such as graywater in flush toilets and bamboo flooring.

Few & Evans Residence Halls

Constructing healthy and highly-efficient buildings and renovating existing ones to green building standards are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainability commitments. This effort contributes to achieving some of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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PAIS Courtyard Bioswale

Emory’s Psychology and Interdisciplinary Sciences Building(PAIS) was completed in 2009 and included a bioswale in its courtyard as a part of its green design. This integrated “green” feature contributed to the PAIS Building recieving its LEED Gold Certification.

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Emory University Hospital Tower

Constructing healthy and highly-efficient buildings and renovating existing ones to green building standards are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainability commitments. This effort contributes to achieving some of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Sorority Village

Earthcraft Certified

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Emory Conference Center Hotel Expansion

Constructing healthy and highly-efficient buildings and renovating existing ones to green building standards are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainability commitments. This effort contributes to achieving some of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Yerkes Neuroscience Building

LEED Silver

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Yerkes Dual Function Facility

Construction on Yerkes Dual Function Research Facility was completed in March 2013 and the building received LEED Gold Certification shortly after its completion.

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Yerkes Integrated Research Addition

Emory’s expansion of the Yerkes Neurosciences Research Building was completed in March 2013 and received LEED Silver Certification for its green design and integrated infrastructure.

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Claudia Nance Rollins Building

LEED Silver

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Whitehead Biomedical Research Building

LEED Silver

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Raoul Residence Hall

Constructing healthy and highly-efficient buildings and renovating existing ones to green building standards are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainability commitments. This effort contributes to achieving some of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Oxford College Library at Emory University

LEED Silver

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Science Building

Constructing healthy and highly-efficient buildings and renovating existing ones to green building standards are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainability commitments.

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Language Hall Addition

Constructing healthy and highly-efficient buildings and renovating existing ones to green building standards are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainability commitments.

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Oxford Dining

LEED Registered

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Fleming Hall

LEED Certified

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1762 Clifton Road Building Solar Panels

Continuing in the quest to reduce its carbon footprint and mitigate environmental degradation, Emory installed its first solar panels on campus in the summer of 2015. This installation was made possible by the Georgia Power Advanced Solar Initiative, which allows entities such as Emory to partner with solar developers in order to install solar panels and then sell the energy produced back to Georgia Power. The 1762 Clifton Road Building was one of the first to be graced with solar panels. These solar panels produce renewable energy which can be used to reduce Emory’s reliance on coal or other fossil fuels for energy consumption.

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WaterHub Solar Panels

Emory’s WaterHub, the first of its kind in the nation and a shining gem of Emory’s Office of Sustainability Initiatives, now also boast solar panels. The solar panels, which have been installed adjacent to the facility, provide a portion of the energy required to run the facility. Together with the solar panels on the North Decatur Building and those found at 1762 Clifton Road, these solar panels provide approximately 265 kWh of energy to Emory’s campus, which is equal to the energy gained from burning approximately 196lbs of fossil fuels for energy–such as coal or natural gas, the primary sources of energy for the Southwest Region of the United States.
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North Decatur Building Solar Panels

Emory’s North Decatur Building was the second building honored with solar panels as part of the Advanced Solar Initiative. Together with the panels installed at the 1762 Clifton Rd Building, these panels provide Emory with a source of renewable energy that reduces our school’s dependence on fossil fuels for energy consumption.

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Cox Hall Solar Power Charging Station

Cox Hall serves as a major dining hall, study center, and recreational space for Emory students and staff alike, and–as of summer 2015–boasts two solar-powered charging stations as well. Students can charge up to three electronic devices at a time at these solar-powered charging stations using a USB plug-in. These stations serve to bring renewable energy awareness to Emory students and thus cultivate a more environmentally conscious atmosphere on campus.

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Law School Solar Charging Station

Emory’s Law School houses solar-powered charging stations students, staff and faculty are able use to charge their electronic devices via USB plug-in at these stations located in the courtyard. These stations help reduce Emory’s consumption of nonrenewable energy and signifies Emory’s commitment to sustainability in all of its schools and campuses.

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ChargePoint Charging Station

Another solar-powered charging station has been installed on Emory’s Oxford campus, allowing Oxford students to utilize renewable energy in order to recharge their electronic devices.

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EmTech Library Service Center Solar Panels

COMING SOON: The EmTech Library Service Center, created in collaboration between Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology, opened its doors in March 2016 and soon will have solar panels installed atop its roof. The Library Service Center was built to house a shared collection amassing millions of books and other materials , with the goal of making these materials seamlessly available to faculty, staff, and students at both Emory and Georgia Tech. This joint project marks the latest chapter in a longstanding public-private partnership between the ATlanta-based institutions and offers advantages for both universities. The solar panels that will top this building will help mitigate the building’s energy use while advancing both universities’ missions of increased sustainability and environmental awareness.

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Nursing Educational Garden

Sustainable food procurement and providing access to healthy, seasonal and local food are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainable food initiative.

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Public Health Educational Garden

Sustainable food procurement and providing access to healthy, seasonal and local food are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainable food initiative.

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The Depot Educational Garden

Sustainable food procurement and providing access to healthy, seasonal and local food are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainable food initiative.

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Few Hall Demonstration Kitchen

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Emory Farmers Market

Since 2008, the Emory Farmers Market has been a lively campus community space for local farms and businesses that offer a wide selection of fresh produce, hand-crafted goods, and diverse beverage and lunch options for students, faculty, and staff.

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Eagle Row Educational Garden

The Emory Educational Garden Project is intended to make small-scale food production accessible through transferring gardening knowledge at weekly workdays and sharing fresh produce with volunteers.

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Cox Hall Educational Garden

Sustainable food procurement and providing access to healthy, seasonal and local food are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainable food initiative.

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Theology Educational Garden

Sustainable food procurement and providing access to healthy, seasonal and local food are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainable food initiative.

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Yerkes Educational Garden

Sustainable food procurement and providing access to healthy, seasonal and local food are cornerstones of Emory’s sustainable food initiative.

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Oxford Organic Farm

The 11-acre piece of land that this farm rests on was given to Oxford by an alumnus in 2011. Oxford decided to create a working organic farm on this land that not only provided fresh produce for student dining, but also provided hands-on interdisciplinary learning experiences for students. Many Oxford faculty members in all fields, including sociology, biology, philosophy, environmental science, and wellness, incorporate Oxford farm into their curricula.

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Convocation Hall

Convocation Hall was formerly the Pitts Theology Library and served as the primary chapel of Emory University. In 1969, it also doubled as the staging ground for one of Emory’s most significant student activism forums–the Black Student Alliance gathered in the chapel that year to address students, faculty, and administrators regarding racial injustices that they felt were still prevalent on Emory’s campus. The BSA marched from the chapel to Cox Hall, kicking off a four day protest that ended with a presentation to Emory Administration of a list of demands which were intended to promote greater equality and diversity on Emory’s campus. This ultimately led to the creation of the African-American Studies program and the hiring of the first African-American administrator.

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Henry L. Bowden Hall

Bowden Hall is named for Henry Bowden, who served as the Chairman on Emory’s Board of Trustees in the mid-1900s. In 1962 Henry Bowden worked with Dean of Emory Law School Ben Johnson Jr. to win a landmark declaratory statement from the Supreme Court of Georgia which allowed Emory to integrate racially without losing its tax-free status.

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Robert W. Woodruff Library

Woodruff Library 10th Floor Balcony

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1599 Clifton Road Parking Deck

Enterprise CarShare is a car share program that a convenient and flexible method of transportation for the Emory community.

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1762 Clifton Road Parking Deck

Enterprise CarShare is a car share program that a convenient and flexible method of transportation for the Emory community.

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Michael Street Parking Deck

Enterprise CarShare is a car share program that a convenient and flexible method of transportation for the Emory community.

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Boisfeuillet Jones Center Parking Deck

In 2019, Emory’s Transportation and Parking Services installed a new electric vehicle charging station on main campus. Since its installation, the unit has contributed to a 17% increase in GHG emissions savings.

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Emory Clinic Parking Deck

Transport accounts for roughly 14 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions. As transport is a function of economic growth, the city of Atlanta and Emory are committed to reducing emissions through investment in and implementation of sustainable transportation solutions.

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Lowergate South Parking Deck

In 2019, Emory’s Transportation and Parking Services installed a new electric vehicle charging station on main campus. Since its installation, the unit has contributed to a 17% increase in GHG emissions savings.

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Peavine Deck EV Charging Station

The Peavine II parking deck has 4 spaces for charging electric vehicles (EV). The Peavine deck location is open to the Emory community and to visitors after 4PM, Monday to Friday.

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Clairmont Campus Parking Deck

Enterprise CarShare is an automated way to rent a vehicle by the hour, the day, or overnight. A variety of makes and models are parked in your community – where you live, and where you work – and are accessible 24/7.

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Oxford Student Center Hard to Recycle Materials Station

In the Rotunda

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Tower Hard to Recycle Materials Station

Plaza level

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SAAC Hard to Recycle Materials Station

In the lobby

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WaterHub at Emory University

The WaterHub is an on-site water recycling system on the Emory University campus which utilizes eco-engineering processes to clean waste water for future non-potable uses. It is the first system of its kind to be installed in the United States. Emory’s WaterHub is capable of recycling over 400,000 gallons-per-day –nearly 40% of Emory’s total campus water needs.

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Biochemistry Connector Green Roof

Water conservation and reclamation are cornerstones of Emory’s water stewardship. These efforts contribute to achieving some of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Emory University Hospital Valet Bioswale

With the renovation of Emory Hospital in 2014, Emory Healthcare incorporated several bioswales into the physical redesign of its buildings, including a bioswale near the Emory University Hospital Valet. By placing bioswales in areas that are likely to produce more highly polluted stormwater, Emory works to mitigate the effects of pollution where they are most directly felt.

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Few Hall Greywater System

Solar power is used to pump rainwater from a cistern into dual-flush toilets.

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Raoul Hall Bioswale

Raoul is Emory’s newest freshman residence hall and proudly boasts many green features–including a bioswale by its entrance to the Office of Residential Life and Housing–which contributes to its LEED Gold Certification. Having sustainable stormwater drainage systems is crucial on Emory’s Atlanta campus, which is hilly and as such floods rather easily.

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Longstreet-Means Hall Green Roof

Longstreet-Means Freshman Residential Hall, which opened in the Fall of 2010, incorporated many green aspects into its design in order to achieve its LEED Gold Certification. One of these green features was a miniature green roof, which lines the windows on the Eastern wall of the third floor. On the other side of the building, another narrow bed of plants have also found a home on a different roof outcropping. The majority of the plants here were not artificially planted, but instead native species, whose spores and seeds landed on these patches of soil.

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Woodruff Circle Bioswale

Woodruff Circle serves as a commuter hub for faculty, students, and Emory Healthcare employees alike for travel in and around Emory’s campus. With dozens of shuttles making daily stops at this circle, it was crucial that Emory incorporated sustainable runoff drainage systems in into the hub’s redesign. With Woodruff Circle Hub’s 2014 renovation, a bioswale was added to sustainably and naturally treat urban stormwater run-off.

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Complex Residence Hall Green Roof

The green roof in Complex Freshman Residential Center sits between Hopkins and Smith halls, and was established in 2015 through an OSI Sustainability Incentives Fund grant. In addition to drought-tolerant plants and native species, this green roof boasts lights, outdoor furniture, water fountains, and electrical outlets. The goal was to design a green space that improved energy efficiency and also cultivated a space for students to study or spend leisure time. Emory works to encourage connections between nature and its community in its cultivation of its green spaces, and this green roof serves as just one example of Emory’s commitment to forging environmental relationships.

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Mathematics & Science Center green roof

The first green roof on Emory’s campus, the green garden topping the Mathematics & Science Center was originally installed in October 2008. The project was part of a student-led pilot study exploring the benefits of green roofs, but in the past decade had fallen into disrepair. The green roof was revived in 2016 by former Emory student Rebecca Park, who had a particular interest in green infrastructure. The MSC green roof now boasts more than 500 native plants–primarily specimens of drought-tolerant sedum and delosperma–and is cared for by students in the environmental sciences department.

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PAIS Courtyard Bioswale

Emory’s Psychology and Interdisciplinary Sciences Building(PAIS) was completed in 2009 and included a bioswale in its courtyard as a part of its green design. This integrated “green” feature contributed to the PAIS Building receiving its LEED Gold Certification.

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WSHCAB Bioswale

With Emory’s renovation of its hospital and health buildings in 2014, Emory Healthcare incorporated bioswales into the physical redesign of many buildings, including the Woodruff Health Sciences Administration Building. There is a bioswale incorporated into the drop-off area near this building in order to directly treat polluted water runoff from heavy traffic in this area.

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Woodruff Library Interfaith Prayer Chapel

Level 1, room 125

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The Living Mandala

Outside of Canon Chapel

The living Mandala is reflective space for students to commune with the natural world. Contemplation, pacing, prayer, reflection, and many forms of meditation are welcome in this space.

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Cannon Chapel

Room 106; Cultivating Compassion Meditation, Graduate Student Meditation, and Emory Buddhist Club convene here. The room also has a labyrinth in the carpet and can be used for personal meditation and praying when events are not happening.

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The Labyrinth

In the bricks between the AMUC and Alabama Hall.

The Labyrinth is a space of pacing and meditation in a central point of transition on campus. It is a perfect place to stop for a moment, rest and be, while the rest of the world continues to move about you.

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School of Medicine meditation space

Room B03; meditation space weekdays from 12-1pm and guided meditation Wednesdays from 12:15-12:45.

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