> SCHOOLS > LIBRARIES > RESOURCES > SEARCH > EMORY HOME
  > HOME   > ABOUT US   > PROGRAMS   > COMMUNITY OUTREACH   > CURRICULUM & RESEARCH   > GET INVOLVED   > EARTH MONTH
June 9, 2009
Source: Piedmont 2008

Bliwise, Nancy Gourash.
Psychology Department

Project Summary

The undergraduate mission of the psychology department is to teach students the scientific basis of behavior and to
provide hands-on experience in psychological research. All of our students conduct their own research in the context of
our statistics and methods sequence, and approximately 40% of our undergraduates gain experiences working in a
faculty member’s lab. My overarching goals for the research sequence are that upon completing these classes, students
1) no longer skip over the method and results sections of journal articles and 2) can apply quantitative reasoning to new
data. The Piedmont Project highlighted the need for research on behavior change and how psychology can contribute to
the development of sustainable environments. In this sequence, students first will collect and analyze data on
environmental attitudes and behavior (PSYC230). Using behavior change theories (e.g., Theory of Planned Behavior,
Environmental Change Model), students will develop a questionnaire, gather data, and test hypotheses drawn from
theory. They will develop statistical skills while testing theoretically-driven hypotheses related to sustainability. The
PSYC200WR class requires that students complete three studies using methods typical of psychological research –
behavioral observation, surveys, and experimentation. The behavioral observation study is conducted as a class and will
examine how status and perceived expertise influence collaboration while undergraduates working in small groups set
priorities for campus sustainability initiatives and develop a plan for engaging students in these efforts. My syllabi are
electronic (one effort to lower paper use) and interactive. Therefore, I will present only the relevant goals, requirements
and assignments for each class. I would like to thank my colleagues in the Piedmont Project for the lively discussions and
helpful suggestions for bringing sustainability into a highly structured course.




Download: Bliwise.pdf (708.7 KB)


Bookmark and Share