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April 20, 2009
Source: Piedmont 2007

Hall, Anne Larson
Environmental Studies Department

2007

Project Summary

Since Environmental Restoration will be offered as a freshman seminar, most students will not have a strong background in our regional ecology. Therefore, the first few weeks of the semester will focus on an introduction to ecosystem functions, an overview of ecosystems of the southeast, readings on the pre-colonial landscape of the southeastern United States and participation on field trips to record observations in local ecosystems. In-class and weekend field experiences will be required of the students, beginning with trips to Lullwater Park, Burbanck Park, Hahn Woods and Wesley Woods, and then off campus to Arabia Mountain, the Alcovy Swamp and the Joyce Kilmer National Forest. The students will be required to participate in restoration activities, including trail restoration, stream restoration and clean up, and the removal of invasive species. In order to establish a connection with the natural world and its restorative capacity, the students will keep illustrated field journals during the semester. The middle section of the course will address human impact on the natural environment. We will analyze changes in land use and the effects these changes have on ecosystems. Readings in Water: A Natural History by Alice Outwater will be used to document the effects of human development on water resources. Readings on the effects of roadways, sprawl and invasive species will be discussed. The final section of the course will center on the ethics and controversies related to restoration practices. Students will present case studies of restoration projects.

Course Syllabus attached.




Download: Hall_2007.pdf (164.9 KB)


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