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April 20, 2009
Source: Piedmont 2003

Carrion, Maria Mercedes
Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Spanish & Portuguese: Jardines y Maravillas. Paisaje, Arquitectura y Subjetividad en Espana.
2003

Project Summary

I came to the Piedmont project meetings intending to develop a course on landscapes, architecture, and subjectivity in early modern spain. The course, as I envisioned it before I came to the project meetings, sought to explore various correspondences between green spaces such as gardens, parks, and forests with aspects of culture in Spain from the tenth through the seventeenth centuries. I was particularly interested in exploring with students the development of urban spaces and the role that these green spaces played in such "cities" becoming central to certain cultural events and phenomena, such as chivalry, "cortesania" (courtiership), nobility, and honor.

However, the most significant impact that the course/project had was to help me think of these not as topical issues pertaining to the printed matter that we could consult in classes, the most conventional aspect of my teaching so far.
Rather, discussions with colleagues about communities, places, and people here in Atlanta made me think of raising these questions in relation to current subjects, especially in terms of the Hispanic demographic explotion here in the past ten years. As some of the cultural events that attracted me to the study of early modern spanish culture still occur in Hispanic communities, at home and abroad (if the performance of chivalry, "cortesanĂ­a" or courtiership, and honor show a different lustre at times than the one printed in documents from the early modern period in Spain), I began to think how is it that environmental issues might contribute to them changing, or not, through the ages. This question does not apply, then to a course on the topic I intended to plan, but to all my courses at Emory.

Course Syllabus attached.




Download: Carrion_2003.pdf (66.7 KB)


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